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Visit us at Battelle 2018

Batelle 2018

REGENESIS and Land Science Contributors at Battelle 2018
Visit Us at Booth #327

SESSION

  • PLATFORM CHAIR – Tom Szocinski- Vapor Intrusion Mitigation and Effectiveness
  • PLATFORM CHAIR – Kristen Thoreson- Abiotic and In Situ Biogeochemical Processes
  • PLATFORM CHAIR – Rick Gillespie- Assessing Performance and Cost of Remedies

PLATFORM SESSIONS

  • PRESENTER – Doug Davis and Owen Miller- Addition of Dual-Valent Iron to Electron Donor Mixtures for Remediation of Chlorinated Ethenes – A Study of Over 100 Wells
  • PRESENTER – John Freim and J. Harvey- Optimizing ZVI Formulations for the Degradation of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons: Effects of Composition and Particle Size
  • PRESENTER – Katherine Djernes Pappano and Kristen A. Thoreson- Enhanced Performance of Colloidal Zero Valent Iron Through Co-treatment with Colloidal Activated Carbon

POSTER PRESENTER

  • POSTER – Steve Nigro, Andrew Halmstad, Avram Frankel, Debra Moser, Tricia Wotan and Craig Sandefur- Implementation Lessons Learned from a VOC-Contaminated Coastal Site in Monterey, CA
  • POSTER – Ryan Moore, Kristine Casper, Anthony Moore and Owen Miller- Chlorinated Solvents in Tight Clay/Weathered Rock Reduced 98% in 17 Months at a Superfund Site
  • POSTER – Daniel Nunez and Elliot Haro- Site Goals Achieved in Two Months at a Santa Barbara Manufacturing Facility Using a Dispersive Colloidal Activated Carbon
  • POSTER – James Harvey and John Freim- In-Situ Delivery of ISCR Reagents: Relationships between Amendment Properties, Injection Methodology and Distribution
  • POSTER – Joseph Good, Jason Hayes, Brian Gochenaur, Mike Burke, Anna Schmiedicke, Lingke Zeng, Stewart Abrams and Maureen Dooley- Combined Treatment Train to Address Mixed Plume at Urban Brownfield
  • POSTER – K.M. Gaskill, D. Davis, and S. Barnes- Controlling Back- Diffusive Mass Loading at Three Midwest Sites with Glaciogenic Interbedded Geology Utilizing a Colloidal Liquide Activated Carbon
  • POSTER – Karin Wilhelm, Ryan Moore and Owen Miller- In-Situ Sensors and Injections Measurements Evaluate Electron Donor Distribution in Low-Permeability Heterogeneous Aquifer Achieving Closure through ERD
  • POSTER – Steven Ridenour, Mike Cassidy, Daniel Nunez and Craig Sandefur- Remediation of Deep Trichloroethene Plume Using Enhanced In-Situ Bioremediation Technology

 

Monday, April 9, 2018

Session: G2. Vapor Intrusion Mitigation and Effectiveness

Platform Chair: Tom Szocinski

 

Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Session: B2: Biological Remedies

Poster Presentation #100: Remediation of Deep Trichloroethene Plume Using Enhanced In-Situ Bioremediation Technology

Presenter: Steve Ridenour

Co-Authors: Mike Cassidy, Dan Nunez and Craig Sandefur

 

Session: D3: Optimizing Remedial Systems

Poster Presentation #187: In-Situ Microcosms Demonstrate Value in Optimizing In-Situ Remediation

Presenter: Matthew Burns

Co-Authors: Matthew Porter, David Carstens, Scott Haitz and Pam Groff

 

Session: E2: Managing/Remediating Chlorinated Solvent Impacts at Fractured Bedrock Sites

Poster Presentation #212: Assessment of PlumeStop to Manage Back Diffusion at a Fractured Sandstone Site

Presenter: Matthew Burns

Co-Authors: Michael J. Brown, Samuel Schoenmann, Timothy Huff and Stephen Kretschman

 

Wednesday, April 11, 2018

Session: B4. Abiotic and In-Situ Biogeochemical Processes

Platform Chair: Kristen Thoreson

 

Session: B4: Abiotic and In-Situ Biogeochemical Processes

Poster Presentation #112: In-Situ Delivery of ISCR Reagents: Relationships between Amendment Properties, Injection Methodology, and Distribution

Presenter: J. Harvey

Co-Author: J. Freim

 

Session: B4: Abiotic and In Situ Biogeochemical

Client Platform Presentation: Assessment of Biogeochemical Processes to Manage Back Diffusion at a Fractured Sandstone Site

Presenter: Matthew Burns

Co-Authors: Michael J. Brown, Timothy Huff, Jeff Baker, Daniel Cummings

 

Session: B4: Abiotic and In Situ Biogeochemical

Platform Presentation: Addition of Dual-Valent Iron to Electron Donor Mixtures for Remediation of Chlorinated Ethenes – A Study of Over 100 Wells

Presenter:  Doug Davis

Co-Author:  Owen Miller

Background/Objectives. We have assessed the effects of a soluble dual valent iron (DVI) substrate addition to an emulsified electron donor mixture to promote the biogeochemical destruction of chlorinated ethenes as part of in situ bioremediation (ISB) treatments in groundwater.  Greater than twenty-four project sites comprising over 100 performance monitoring wells across the U.S were studied.  This study will present the differences in dechlorination kinetic rates, magnitude of reduction and daughter product formation between wells that were within target treatment zones (TTZs) receiving DVI treatment vs. wells that did not receive this treatment.  This study will also present cost differences in the context of net performance to inform economic decisions by stakeholders of chlorinated ethene remediation sites where ISB and biogeochemical approaches are being considered. The study focuses exclusively on this quartet of chlorinated ethene contaminants: perchloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE), cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) and vinyl chloride (VC).

 

Approach/Activities.  ISB treatments were completed through direct, low-pressure injection of an emulsified electron donor (i.e., hydrogen donor) into groundwater impacted with chlorinated ethene compounds at over two dozen project sites included in the study. In nearly all cases, a bioaugmentation substrate containing an active culture of Dehalococcoides was also applied.  Of the over 100 wells studied, nearly half also received DVI which was added to the electron donor mixture immediately prior to injection.  All wells included in the study were within grid arrays of injection points so that time effects due to delayed contaminant contact with the substrate could be minimized. The ISB reagents used were constant and substrate loading rates into the TTZs were maintained within a relatively narrow range allowing for a measurable assessment of the resulting difference in dechlorination rates for these compounds with or without liquid DVI addition.

 

Results/Lessons Learned.  Significantly increased dechlorination rates were observed in wells that received ISB treatment augmented with liquid DVI.  The average time required to reach 90% reduction from a peak concentration in wells following injection of ISB and DVI substrates were improved by over 140 days and 60 days for PCE and TCE, respectively, compared to wells that only received ISB.  Similar trends were observed for daughter product formation, with the time for VC to reach peak concentration and then be reduced by 90% both being improved by approximately 90 days.  Most often costing less than $3 per cubic yard, the liquid DVI treatment is minimal relative to the total project cost and should be considered by project stakeholders in context of the site remediation goals and timelines for qualifying sites.

 

Session: B5: Zero Valent Iron Applications

Platform Presentation: Optimizing ZVI Formulations for the Degradation of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons: Effects of Composition and Particle Size

Presenter: John Freim

Co-Author: J. Harvey

Background Objectives: Zero valent iron (ZVI) is a powerful reductant used to decontaminate soil and groundwater containing halogenated hydrocarbons and other toxic contaminants. ZVI products have disparate properties and remediation performance is highly dependent on material characteristics including include particle size, composition, and surface modifications.  Understanding and optimizing the relationship between ZVI properties and remediation performance can result in more rapid and complete in-situ remediation.

Approach/Activities: The research program investigated the ability of several types of ZVI to degrade aqueous phase perchloroethylene, trichloroethylene, and chloroform.  Dry powders that were studied included sub-micrometer powder (NZVI), carbonyl iron, and screened commodity iron ranging in size from 600 mesh (20 m) to 50 mesh (300 m).  Colloidal products that were studied included a ZVI product suspended in glycerol and a ZVI product suspended in water. ZVI PRB, an aqueous suspension of microscale iron was also evaluated.  Surface modified products include small additions of palladium and iron sulfide that were deposited onto the surface of AquaZVI and MicroZVI products.  Reactivity was evaluated by adding 2 g/L of colloidal products and 10 to 50 g L of commodity microscale products to closed bottles.  Composition was measured using headspace gas and a gas chromatograph with an ECD detector. Experiments were also performed to evaluate the rates of hydrogen gas generated by the reaction of ZVI and water.

Results/Lessons Learned: Pseudo first order kinetics were measured with correlation coefficients generally greater than 0.99.  The study indicated that for chlorinated ethenes, particle size had a modest effect of reactions kinetics.  Surface modification had a much more dramatic effect, particularly for the reaction of sulfidized colloidal products with chlorinated ethenes.  These products exhibited pseudo-first order rate constants 30-50 times greater than dry commodity products.  For chlorinated methanes, surface modifications had a smaller effect on degradation rates. Sulfidized products also decreased the rates of hydrogen gas generation potentially increasing reactivity capacity and lifetime.

 

Session:  B6: In-Situ Chemical Reduction

Poster Presentation #146: In-Situ Sensors and Injections Measurements Evaluate Electron Donor Distribution in Low-Permeability Heterogeneous Aquifer Achieving Closure through ERD

Presenter: Karin Wilhelm
Co-Authors:  Ryan Moore and Owen Miller

 

Session: C6: Injectables Activated Carbon Amendments 

Platform Presentation: Enhanced Performance of Colloidal Zero Valent Iron Through Co-treatment with Colloidal Activated Carbon

Presenter: Katherine Djernes Pappano

Co-Author:  Kristen A. Thoreson

Background/Objectives. This paper explores combining the sorptive properties of colloidal activated carbon (cAC) with the reductive properties of colloidal zero valent iron (cZVI) to remediate contaminated soil and groundwater and to provide control over contaminant flux of both parent and daughter products in solution. cZVI provides a highly reducing groundwater environment, and cZVI can remediate chlorinated ethenes by both biotic and abiotic reductive pathways. While the abiotic reductive dechlorination pathway degrades PCE to ethene and ethane via an acetylene intermediate, thereby avoiding the formation of cis-DCE and VC, some generation of daughter products through the biotic pathway is unavoidable. cAC removes contaminants from aqueous solution by sorption and provides a matrix for the degradation of contaminants. The sorptive properties of cAC minimize the release of chlorinated daughter products into solution. The contaminants remain bound to cAC until they have been reduced to environmentally benign end products.

The colloidal nature of the activated carbon and ZVI allows the materials to be co-applied at low pressure with uniform distribution in the subsurface to ensure contact with contaminants. This dual technology approach allows the rapid removal of contaminants and provides long term treatment with a single application of product.

Approach/Activities. The sorption and degradation of PCE by activated carbon and ZVI was analyzed in batch and column laboratory studies. Batch studies were performed analyzing cAC and cZVI separately and in combination in the presence of a chlorinated solvent degrading bacteria inoculum. To monitor both the sorption of PCE onto activated carbon as well as any degradation, the PCE and daughter product concentrations in the aqueous solution were monitored, and organic extractions were also performed to measure the total mass balance across all phases (water, soil, colloidal materials). Column studies were completed to study the sorption and degradation of PCE by cAC and/or cZVI under biotic conditions in a flow through system. A separate series of sand column studies were conducted to test the transport properties of these colloidal agents by measuring breakthrough curves.

Results/ Lessons Learned. The combined data from the batch and flow through column studies revealed that using cZVI and cAC together leads to greater removal of contaminants from solution through sorption and a combination of biotic and abiotic degradation relative to the systems that are treated with cZVI alone. Treating batch samples with both cAC and cZVI allowed 92 % removal of PCE and daughter products whereas only 21 % of chlorinated ethenes were removed by cZVI alone during the timeframe of the study. Contaminants are sorbed rapidly to cAC, and once sorbed, contaminants are available to be degraded either by contaminant degrading bacteria or by cZVI. The sorptive capacity of cAC is not diminished by the presence of cZVI; rather the degradation of contaminants either by bacteria or by cZVI allows regeneration of cAC and long-term control over matrix back diffusion. Transport studies show that both colloidal formulations are readily transported through conductive zones.

 

Session: C6: Injectables Activated Carbon Amendments

Poster Presentation: Controlling Back-Diffusive Mass Loading at Three Midwest Sites with Glaciogenic Interbedded Geology Utilizing a Colloidal Liquid Activated Carbon

Presenter: Keith Gaskill

Co-Authors: D. Davis, and S. Barnes

 

Session: D5. Assessing Performance and Cost of Remedies

Platform Chair: Rick Gillespie

 

Session: D5: Assessing Performance and Cost of Remedies 

Client Platform Presentation: Balancing the Cost of Short-Term Cleanup and Long-Term Stewardship during Remediation Decision Making

Presenter:  Jeff Carnahan

 

Session: E6: Low Permeability Zone Case Studies

Poster Presentation #175: Chlorinated Solvents in Tight Clay/Weathered Rock Reduced 98% in 17 Months at a Superfund Site

Presenter: Ryan Moore

Co-Authors: Kristine Casper, Anthony Moore and Owen Miller

 

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Session: A9: PFAS: Remediation

Poster Presentation #9: First In-Situ Treatment of PFAS Ever? Lessons Learned and Questions Raised.

Presenter: Jeremy Birnstingl

Co-Authors: Rick McGregor and Grant Carey

 

Session: B7: Lessons Learned with In-Situ Technologies

Poster Presentation #39: Implementation Lessons Learned from a VOC-Contaminated Coastal Site in Monterey, CA

Presenter: Steve Nigro

Co-Authors: Andrew Halmstad, Avram Frankel, Debra Moser, Tricia Wotan and Craig Sandefur

 

Session: B7 : Lessons Learned with In-Situ Technologies

Poster Presentation #76: Site Goals Achieved in Two Months at a Santa Barbara Manufacturing Facility Using a Dispersive Colloidal Activated Carbon

Presenter: Dan Nunez

Co-Author: Elliot Haro

 

Session: D7: Reusing and Revitalizing Contaminated Sites

Poster Presentation #128: Combined Treatment Train to Address Mixed Plume at

an Urban Brownfield Site

Presenter: J.F. Good

Co-Authors: J. Hayes, B. Gochenaur, M. Burke, A. Schmiedicke, L. Zeng, S. Abrams and M. Dooley